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IncuCount Colony Counters

Colony Counter

The IncuCount is an automated colony counter. Revolutionary Science has been a long standing manufacturer of automatic colony counter technology since 2009. Applications for the IncuCount are bacterial growth, recombinant DNA vectors that produce blue white screening, gram staining listeria, bacterial CRISPR and e. Coli, salmonella and listeria detection. It will count spiral plates and is an excellent choice for food safety microbiologists. The IncuCount automated colony counter has the ability to differentiate colonies based on color and even measure the inhibition zones of antibiotic reactions. The IncuCount is available in two models, the Basic and the Pro with varying sophistication. The IncuCount has been featured in the biotech laboratory on CBS’s popular TV show, ZOO and has also been written about in the International Business Times and Yahoo! News.

Area of Focus

Microbiology

Food/Beverage

Bacteriology

Pharmaceutical

Environmental & Water

Applications

Counting bacterial colonies

Ames test

Antibiotic susceptibility

Bioburden test

Environmental monitoring

Microbial Limits test

Preservative Efficacy test

Single Radial Immunodiffusion

Cancer research

Plaque Counts (Transduction)

Yeast Complementation Assay

Microbial overlap analysis

Carbonated drinks microbial growth analysis

Mouse Lymphoma Count

Bascillus

CRISPR for bacteria

LB Agar transformation

Bacterial transformation

Microfiltration

Microorganism Growth Rate

Counting CFU’s

Mammalian cell colonies

Water plate count (Drinking Water)

Raw water Analysis

Juice Yeast and Mold Count

Lab Proficiency Testing

StemCell (Haematopoeitic) Count

Particle Counting

Monitor antibiotic resistance of bacteria

Antibiotics can be tested for efficacy in a myriad of ways. One of the most common is to view inhibition zones on a petri plate. A petri plate (typically 90 or 100 mm) can be inoculated with bacteria. Antibiotic impregnated wafers of different strains are placed on the plate. The plate is incubated at an optimal temperature (usually 37C) inside an incubator, like the Incufridge. As bacteria grows it may refrain from growing near an antibiotic that it is not resistant to. This area of inhibition is called an inhibition zone or zone of inhibition. An inhibition zone can be measured with a caliper, recorded and compared or an automated colony counter, like the IncuCount can automatically measure the inhibition zones, compare and automatically store the data with ease. Aseptic techniques should be employed. Petri plates should be properly disposed of after they are no longer needed, by sterilizing in an autoclave, like the Saniclave 50.

Grow bacterial colonies and bacterial reactions

Bacteria growth is usually performed under temperature conditions. Petri plates are filled with with agar, which feeds bacteria that are inoculated on the surface. Under the proper conditions (usually 37 degrees Celsius), the bacteria will consume the agar as food and grow into colonies called colony forming units (CFU’s). The Revolutionary Science Incufridge is a chilling incubator that can be used as a standard bacterial incubator for growing bacterial colonies on petri plates. Counting colonies quantifies the affinity the colonies have for the agar, but also is indicative of the amount of bacteria. Colonies may be counted by hand or by using the Revolutionary Science IncuCount, an automated cell counter. Aseptic techniques should be employed. Petri plates should be properly disposed of after they are no longer needed, by sterilizing in an autoclave, like the Saniclave 50.

Transform bacterial DNA through methods using heat shock and recombination

Bacterial (prokaryotic) chromosomes are in the form of hoops and circles and are far smaller than eukaryotic chromosomes. By forcing a plasmid (circular strand of foreign DNA) to enter a bacterial cell, the plasmid can merge into the chromosome can be change the DNA. This process is called transformation. Bacterial cells and the plasmid of interest can be stored in a warm environment (most likely at 37C). A solution can be stored in a Revolutionary Science Incufridge and Poly Pro Bath. During this incubation period, the cell walls become porous and allow the plasmid to enter. Solution can then be transferred to a water bath at 42 degrees Celsius. The abrupt change in temperature will “heat shock” the solution. When the cell is exposed to the elevated temperature, the lipid membrane closes and holds in the plasmid, allowing it to insert itself into the chromosome and reprogram it. Bacterial cells can be inoculated on a petri plate, incubated in an incubator, where colony forming units (CFU’s) can be counted either by hand or with an automated colony counter, like the IncuCount. Aseptic techniques should be employed. Petri plates should be properly disposed of after they are no longer needed, by sterilizing in an autoclave, like the Saniclave 50.

Grow and check viability of eukaryotic cells

Culturing eukaryotic cells is to grow cells outside of their natural environment. Cells, such as mammalian cells thrive in a CO2 saturated environment. This can be accomplished using a CO2 incubator, with temperature, humidity, CO2 and O2 regulation. Quantifying the amount of cells in a cultured sample is indicative of the efficacy of the cell culturing process. Cells may be counted using a hemocytometer and a microscope. However, for efficient and accurate counting, a Revolutionary Science automated cell counter, the RevCount may be preferred.

Recognize the presence of bacteria through incubation and staining

Some strains of bacteria can be nearly indistinguishable from other strains. Various strains of bacteria may even share indistinguishable growth rates or affinity for the same agar. In order to differentiate, gram staining can be a fast and effective process. Stains of bacteria in question can be inoculated on multiple petri plates or even in separate quadrants of the same plate. The plates are incubated in an incubator, like the Incufridge at an optimal temperature, like 37C or lower. When the growth is determined sufficient, the petri plate is washed with various dyes. The reason this is done is because different bacteria may have a chemical affinity for different stains. If the bacteria absorbs the stain, the bacterial colonies that have an affinity for the state will change color, while the other bacteria that does not have an affinity for the stain remains visibly unchanged. For a closer analysis, the IncuCount, automated colony counter can be used to analyze and count the stained and unstained colonies. Aseptic techniques should be employed. Petri plates should be properly disposed of after they are no longer needed, by sterilizing in an autoclave, like the Saniclave 50.